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Heroes Community > Library of Enlightenment > Thread: Creatures (where thay came from)
Thread: Creatures (where thay came from) [ This thread is 3 pages long: (1) 2 3 ]
HALT
HALT


Known Hero
Knight of Justice
posted February 08, 2003 08:19 PM

Creatures (where thay came from)

HI all!   long time no see!

Ok here is idea.

We all know heroes creatures dragons, angels, titans, elves and etc. But do you know anything about this creatures beyond heroes? i mean where thay came from from what lagends, myths?
Say do you know how many different kind of dragons exist?
I know Red, green, blue, white, black, gold, silver, some of tham good some bad. Did anyone aver heared about water dragons? and what are thay cappeble of?
How about nagas? Do you know anythig about nagas?
Lets make some profiles on creatures.

Let me start.

Who should i pick? ahha

RED DRAGONS: As long as i know thay are the largest dragons from all athers eccept black. I think thay bilong to the forces of evel. They are a firebrithing dragons. Do not use mageic in the fights. Very strong. Smart. Agresive.

thats all i know. add some more.

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Celfious
Celfious


Responsible
Legendary Hero
NPC
posted February 08, 2003 10:33 PM

I'm not sure, but..

Elves, dwarfs, halflings.. And other variations of man didn't originate. They just "are" in fantasy ledgends & folklore.

Ogres, as I hear in lotr, were tourtured elves. I'm not so sure about this fact.
I would like to know who thought of them, and made the stories world known.
Whats the first story ever with elves, dwarves ect??

Vampires-Absolute BS, twisted with bible stories.

Zombies-Arizen from death

Liches-Necromancers who do some thing to become like undead for power (someone please emphisize)

Crusaders- Ones who try to defend men under god, under god.
Tiz about all that I know.. Accept they are real aswell as mythological.

Monks (lol) I wish I was a monk sometimes

Zealeots- NWC.. A zeleot is a religious fanatic.
If I suddenly started doing out of reality things in the name of religion.. Willing to do anything, and sacrifice anything for the religion.. I'm a Zeleot.

How about blobs?? The common weak units in video games.
I figure they are the undeveloped organizm, combined together or something :shrugs:

Medusa.. Once again, she just *was* in a story.
Are there even prequals to these fables?

Gremlin-only ones beside Homm I know, is Gizmo and evil siblings.

Genie-
blablabla..
next?
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silx87
silx87


Supreme Hero
posted February 09, 2003 01:50 AM
Edited By: silx87 on 9 Feb 2003

Well,these are from Greek mythology:

Gorgons a fire breathing bull or something that lived on some island somewhere.

Minotaur-well,there's a long legend about how the minotaur was born and then defeated by Theseus,but unfortunately I don't have the time to write it right now,basically they are a large half bull,half human creature,that lived in a maze and ate ppl that were sent in the maze.

Medusa-well,another long story,but shortly,a woman that after insulting Artemis,was turned so ugly,that if a human saw it,it turned in to stone,medusa was put to a remote island where she gave birth to pegasus

Pegasus-after medusa was turned into a monster,Poseidon felt sorry for her,and not wanting for her to give birth to another monster,he turned her baby into a winged horse,the pegasus.

Hydra-dunno much bout the hydra,basically just a huge snake with many heads

Titans-were the children of Uranos and Gaia,one of them killed Uranos and became king,however,his son Zeus defeated him and the other titans in war and became king instead,
basically most of the titans were freaks,with multiple heads,eyes,hands or legs

Centaur-dunno much of those,just half horse,half man

Harpy-dunno much of these either,very annoyng flyng freaks,half woman,half birdie

cyclops-one eyed giants,very big and strong

So there u have it,that's where these freaks are from,personally,I think whoever made up Greek mythology,is one sick dude!


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Apophis
Apophis


Known Hero
Creeping Death
posted February 09, 2003 08:49 AM

Quote:

Hydra-dunno much bout the hydra,basically just a huge snake with many heads


Hydra is from greek mythology too. Hercules killed her.
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silx87
silx87


Supreme Hero
posted February 09, 2003 02:47 PM

Quote:
Quote:

Hydra-dunno much bout the hydra,basically just a huge snake with many heads


Hydra is from greek mythology too. Hercules killed her.


Yeah,I know that.I think the hydra was guarding a tree or something.
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Lord_Woock
Lord_Woock


Honorable
Undefeatable Hero
Daddy Cool with a $90 smile
posted February 09, 2003 02:55 PM

Quote:
cyclops-one eyed giants,very big and strong


If my memory serves me right, they were the brothers of the titans.
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PsYkOtIc-Dra...
PsYkOtIc-Dragoon


Known Hero
Master Thief
posted February 09, 2003 03:20 PM

Quote:

Ogres, as I hear in lotr, were tourtured elves. I'm not so sure about this fact.


Wrong....that's Orcs not Ogres

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IYY
IYY


Responsible
Supreme Hero
Psychedelic Bard
posted February 09, 2003 04:17 PM

Quote:
I would like to know who thought of them, and made the stories world known.
Whats the first story ever with elves, dwarves ect??


They are all ancient celtic, scandinavian, norse etc. mythologies. They were revived in Tolkien's stories.
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silx87
silx87


Supreme Hero
posted February 09, 2003 07:16 PM

Quote:


They are all ancient celtic, scandinavian, norse etc. mythologies. They were revived in Tolkien's stories.


That's true.
As we all know(or maybe not),Tolkien did a lot of research on old languages and mythology.He made the elvish languages,based on old almost extinct languages.
He also took creatures from mythologys and put them in his story.
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Marelt_Ekiran
Marelt_Ekiran


Promising
Famous Hero
Watcher of All
posted February 09, 2003 07:19 PM

There are also a few creatures from biblical origen:

- Angel, obvious.

- Devil, obvious.

- Behemoth (surprise, surprise). A large beast mentioned in the book of Job. Thought to be a hippo.

- Ice demon, the idea of the demon is from the bible. The Ice part was probably invented by NWC.

The are a few more creatures from the Greek mythology.

- Griffin (forgot the origen).

- Cerberus (three-headed dog, guarding the gates of Hades).

Some various ones:

- Golem (various forms). The golem comes from jewish mythology. A rabby once made a creature out of clay and made it live by writing the jewish word for truth on its forhead. Various endings.

- Genie, spirit from Arabian or Indian mythology. Don't know the origen.

- Efreet, originally Afreet. Evil spirit of great power from Arabian mythology.

- All life creatures have some origen from the european history (except the Angel).

- Mummy, take a guess.
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silx87
silx87


Supreme Hero
posted February 09, 2003 07:29 PM

Quote:

Griffin (forgot the origen).

Cerberus (three-headed dog, guarding the gates of Hades).





Sorry,totally forgot bout those.

The cerberus-guards the gate to the underworld,lets dead souls in,but lets nobody out of the underworld(except Hermes)

Dunno bout griffons.


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Celfious
Celfious


Responsible
Legendary Hero
NPC
posted February 10, 2003 01:31 PM
Edited By: Celfious on 10 Feb 2003

Quote:

They are all ancient celtic, scandinavian, norse etc. mythologies. They were revived in Tolkien's stories.


Anyidea on where to get this type of source??
Perhaps one day I'll come across a decent book store to buy this knowledge.

It is intertesting to reade some of these things.
It's something we play with every day, and to know, minotours were half human/bulls put in mazes, for whatever reason.

What else, what other thingies and facts are there that we know?

Mermaids?
Ghosts?
More about the previous disscussed??
ect..

edit-point recived
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Kuma
Kuma


Promising
Famous Hero
u can type so much text in her
posted February 10, 2003 02:45 PM

Back to the subject

Back to the subject. Toss somewhere else plz.

Troglodytes are a tribe from Tunesia (and prolly in some other parts of Africa too) that lived in caves.




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Celfious
Celfious


Responsible
Legendary Hero
NPC
posted February 10, 2003 02:52 PM

But the actual creature..
I think barbarians are strong fighters.
Is it true, they are just humans who fight for what they want/need?
Or were they just released slaves? Who used to be gladiators?
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Lord_Woock
Lord_Woock


Honorable
Undefeatable Hero
Daddy Cool with a $90 smile
posted February 10, 2003 03:48 PM

barbarian - adj. & n. uncivilized or uncultured (person).

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Dmnd
Dmnd


Famous Hero
Confused Girlie
posted February 11, 2003 12:13 AM

Quote:
Anyidea on where to get this type of source??
Perhaps one day I'll come across a decent book store to buy this knowledge.


At the library I work in this book is a very popular source for students:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0316341142/qid=1044922179/sr=2-1/ref=sr_2_1/102-9442650-5976141

Maybe you want to look for it  I have never really looked at it myself, its usually always out hehe, but I just remember it cos I am always finding it for them.
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TheEverLiving
TheEverLiving


posted February 11, 2003 12:32 AM
Edited By: TheEverLiving on 10 Feb 2003

The Hydra:

The hydra was a nine-headed monster which Hercules destroyed with the help of his nephew Iolaus. The difficulties were that one of the heads would bite while the hero was trying to cut off another and the ninth head was immortal and if ever it was cut off, two would grow in its place.

In those days, there was a beast living in the swamps of Lerna that ravaged the countryside devouring cattle. It was known as the Hydra. For his second labor, Eurystheus ordered Hercules to rid the world of this predatory monster.

Taking his nephew, Iolaus (a surviving son of Hercules' brother Iphicles), as his charioteer, Hercules set out to destroy the beast. Of course Hercules couldn't simply shoot an arrow at the beast or club him to death with his club. There had to be something special about the beast that made normal mortals unable to control it.

The Lernaean monster had nine heads, and one of these was immortal. If ever a mortal head was cut, from the stump would immediately spring forth two new heads. Wrestling with the beast proved difficult because while trying to attack one head, another would use its fangs to bite Hercules' leg. Ignoring the nipping at his heels and calling upon Iolaus for help, Hercules arranged to have Iolaus burn the neck the second Hercules took a head off. In this way the stump could not regenerate. When all eight mortal necks were headless and cauterized, Hercules sliced off the immortal head and buried it underground with a stone on top to hold it down.

Having dispatched with the head, Hercules dipped his arrows in the gall of the beast, and in this way, as he would soon learn, he made his arrows lethal.

Upon returning to the outskirts of Tiryns, Eurystheus denied Hercules credit for the labor because Iolaus had helped out.

Although the golden horned Cerynitian hind was sacred to Artemis, Eurystheus ordered Hercules to bring it to him alive. It would have been easy enough to kill the beast, but capturing it proved challenging. After a year of trying to capture it, Hercules broke down and shot it with an arrow -- appparently NOT one of those he'd previously dipped in the hydra's blood. The arrow didn't prove fatal, but did provoke the indignation of the goddess Artemis. However, when Hercules explained his mission, she understood, and let him be. He was thus able to carry the beast alive to Mycenae and King Eurystheus.

Oo_TEL_oO

David Bowie: Lets Dance
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TheEverLiving
TheEverLiving


posted February 11, 2003 01:33 AM
Edited By: TheEverLiving on 10 Feb 2003

Footprints Of Dragons

Hiya, something I found along my Internet travels.

Author: Lourella Rouster

Almost all our early ancestors believed the earth was inhabited, especially in unknown regions, by dragons. Where did they get such an idea? Did it stem from a universal human imagination? An inherited need or instinct? An inherited subconscious memory of dinosaurs? All these suggestions have been made, and taken seriously by groups of people. I believe dragons are the reflection, sometimes embellished through retelling but mostly historical, of actual physical encouters of human beings with dinosaurs.

Francis Schaeffer, philosopher-theologian, has written, "I am not at all convinced it has been proven that the dinosaurs became extinct prior to the advent of man. I believe there is much evidence, ancient and modern, to indicate that dinosaurs and humankind existed on earth contemporaneously, and that human beings, while they probably lived in different regions than dinosaurs for the most part, did on many occasions encounter the sometimes huge and fearsome creatures. The memories of these encounters were so vivid and deep that they were passed down in a multitude of cultures as legends, painted on cave walls, represented in pottery, and written of in literature.

Etymology of "dragon"The word "dragon," according to the Oxford English Dictionary (1966), is derived from the Old French, which in turn was derived from the Latin dracon (serpent), which in turn was derived from the Greek Spakov (serpent), from the Greek aorist verb, Spakelv (to see clearly). It is related to many other ancient words related to sight, such as Sanskrit darc (see), Avestic darstis (sight), Old Irish derc (eye), Old English torht, Old Saxon torht and Old High German zoraht, all meaning clear, or bright. The roots of the word can be traced, then, back to most early Indo-European tongues. This may indicate that it is possible the immediate ancestor of the word was a part of the original hypothetical Indo-European tongue which may have been a part of the vocabulary of Japheth's descendants, soon after the Flood and the dispersion from Babel.

The Oxford English Dictionary points out that Spakelv is derived from the Greek stem Spak meaning strong. The connection with dragons is obvious. According to the OED, the word was first used in English about 1220 A.D. It was used in English versions of the Bible from 1340 on.

Ubiquitous dragons

A modern book, The Greatest Monsters in the World, (1975), contains a chapter called "Dragons Everywhere." This title is accurate, because ancient belief in dragons appears to have been nearly universal, as far as we can determine from prehistoric art, legend, and the world's most ancient writings.

Dragons in Ancient Art

In art, dragons are a motif used in ancient pottery. The motif appears as bowl decorations in China as late as 202 A.D.

In Anne Ross's book, Pagan Celtic Britain, is a picture of a pot motif from the ancient Urnfield culture which blossomed in Europe prior to 500 B.C. The Bali portray a dragon in their animal mask of Barong, a good spirit which is central in their ritual dramatic presentations.

Perhaps the earliest evidence, however, is found in a prehistoric cave at La Baume, Latrone, France. Discovered in 1940 by Siegfried Giedion, some scientists have dated the cave at 20,000 years ago (I do not accept such ancient dates). Peter Costello writes, "dominating the whole scene is a serpent over three metres in length." As Costello notes, this picture of a dragon-like creature "appeared at the very dawn of art," whatever its exact date.

At Lydney Park on the banks of Severn in Gloucestershire, England, a mosaic floor of Romano-Celtic origin has been excavated. It appears to be a temple associated with the river cult of Nodens, "the cloud maker." Prominent in the mosaic are sea monsters that may well be considered dragons.

Dragons in Ancient Literature

In literature, dragons are certainly a virtually universal ancient motif. Dragons are found in the early literature of the English, Irish, Danish, Norse, Scandinavians, Germans, Greeks, Romans, Egyptians and Babylonians. Among the American Indians, legends of dragons flourished among the Crees, Algonquins, Onondagas, Ojibways, Hurons, Chinooks, Shoshones, and Alaskan Eskimos.

One of the most famous Danish dragon tales is from "Sigurd of the Volsungs" and concerns "The Slaying of Fafnir." Sigurd, the hero of the epic, is afraid of Fafnir the dragon because his tracks seem great. This surely would have been true of the large dinosaurs, whether the footprints themselves, or the sound of their approach were being considered. Sigurd hides in a pit, and when the dragon crawls to the water, he strikes up into its heart. Again, if a man were to slay a large dinosaur, this would be an intelligent way to do it, for one would be out of the way of the creature's powerful tail and sharp, meat-rending teeth. Probably the head, neck and heart were the only truly vulnerable areas on the huge body. Most dinosaurs were basically water creatures. Therefore, everything in this scene is totally realistic, and makes good dinosaur-hunting strategy.

Sigurd is afraid he will drown in the dragon's blood, which may be another indication as to the size of the creature. If the dragon had fallen over the mouth of the pit, Sigurd's drowning in its blood would have been a distinct possibility.

As the dragon approaches, it blows poison before it. The dragon talks to Sigurd. In the talking we undoubtedly have some embellishment, but this is not surprising in an early folk tale that was passed down for uncounted generations. Sigurd's friend, Regin, cuts out the dragon's heart, and asks Sigurd to roast it and serve it to him. When Regin touches the dragon's blood to his to his tongue, he understands the speech of birds. Here again we probably have an embellishment, perhaps associating dragons in a symbolic way with wisdom, a frequent association in early literature.

Both the dragon in this early Danish epic and the dragon in the Old English epic, Beowulf, guard a treasure. We can only speculate as to the origin of this idea. It's possible that a dinosaur did in fact make off with some loot, or it's possible that the abode of dinosaurs was so unapproachable that ancient peoples imagined their dens to be loaded with treasures. Did the two dragons come from the same early legend? We do not know.

The unnamed dragon in Beowulf also vomits flames. It is fifty feet long, as measured after its death. As with Fafnir, "earth dwellers much dread him." He is a night creature, associated with evil, and described as "smooth" and "hateful."

Dragons in Legend and Folklore

Greek heroes who are supposed to have slain dragons are Hercules, Apollo, and Perseus. Indeed, the World Book Encyclopedia (1973) says "every country had them in its mythology." In Norse mythology, a Great Ash Tree, Yggdrasil, which was thought to support the whole universe, had three immense roots. One extended into the region of death. Niflheim and the dragon Nidhogg perpetually gnawed at the root of the tree. This precarious situation, which seems to place the whole universe at Nidhogg's mercy, perhaps shows the conscious or subconscious deeply rooted fear of the proto-Norse for dinosaurs, those terrible lizards. If the fearsome creatures were threatening the ancestors of the Norse peoples, one can easily see how such a myth could have developed.

The Egyptians wrote of the dragon Apophis, enemy of the sun god Re. The Babylonians recorded their belief in the monster Tiamat. The Norse people wrote of Lindwurm, guardian of the treasure of Rheingold, who was killed by the hero Siegfried. The Chinese wrote of dragons in their ancient book, I Ching, associating the creatures with power, fertility, and well being. They also used dragons in early art, ancient pottery, folk pageantry and dances as a motif. The Aztecs' plumed serpent may have represented a hybrid in their thought between a dragon and another creature. The pottery of ancient Nazca culture of Peru shows a cannibal monster much like a dragon.

In British Columbia, Lake Sashwap is believed to be home to the dragon Ta Zam-A, and Lake Cowichan to Tshingquaw. In Ontario, Lake Meminisha is the reputed home of a fish-like serpent feared by the Cree Indians. Angoub is the legendary Huron dragon, Hiachuckaluck the dragon believed in by the Chinooks of British Columbia.

Dragons are so widely accepted a part of Irish folklore that Robert Lloyd Praeger, naturalist, says they are "an accepted part of Irish zoology." Dr. P.W. Joyce, historian, in his book on Irish place-names, says, "legends of aquatic monsters are very ancient among the Irish people" and shows that many Irish place names resulted from a belief in these dragons.

Interpretations

Many theories have been set forth proposing to explain the virtually universal belief in dragons among ancient peoples. Some have seen dragons as a product of the human imagination, resulting from fear of the unknown. It has been pointed out that as late as 1600 A.D., maps were decorated about the borders of unknown regions with drawings of dragon-like monsters. Yet it is hard to imagine how such widely separated people groups all imagined virtually the same thing, if that imagined entity had no basis in reality or in their experience.

In my undergraduate study of literature, one frequent interpretation of archetypes in lierature was that people had a universal need to believe in these things, that the human subconscious understood at some deep level the same set of symbols, perhaps gained through their common (supposed) evolutionary ancestry. The most frequent modern interpretation given to myths and archetypes is that they are subconsciously symbolic. One wonders, however, why it is only humankind that has left this constant, ancient record of dealings with dragons, and how such a memory could have lived through millions of years of evolution and changes into entirely different kinds of animals.

For these reasons, even many secular authors have come almost, but not quite, to the conclusion that early people encountered dinosaurs, and passed down the memory of these encounters in tales of dragons. Peter Costello, who researched Lake Monster legends and alleged sightings in considerable depth, wrote, "...as we go through the early accounts of Irish lake monsters we shall find that there is often only a superficial covering of fancy...real animals are clearly behind some of the stories."

The World Book Encyclopedia (1973) notes "the dragons of legend are strangely like actual creatures that have lived in the past. They are much like the giant reptiles which inhabited the earth long before man is supposed to have appeared on earth."

The writer's use of the phrase "is supposed to have appeared" shows that he recognized the problem. Man was not supposed to have appeared until much later, but it surely seems that man did in fact see dinosaurs, drawing pictures and writing about what he saw. How could he have written about something that lay buried deep within the earth, having died out millions of years earlier?

Peter Costello presents the same problem. "The plesiosaur theory," he writes, "which appeared early o n, still has many supporters....but again the difficulties, whether it could have survived for sixty million years undetected...are very great."

Daniel Cohen, author of The Greatest Monsters in the World, also says that there is a "sensational possiblity" that the dragon legend originated with the dinosaurs, observing that:

no creatures that ever lived looked more like dragons than dinosaurs...there is a problem with this theory. The problem is time. As far as we know, all the dinosaurs died out over 70 million years ago. That long ago, there were no people on earth. So who could remember the dinosaurs?

Cohen says that "some early discoverers of dinosaur bones called them 'dragon bones'." But apparently because the time and evolutionary development problems are so great in the minds of those who have accepted this model of origins, Cohen boldly asserts that "scientists today no longer identify dinosaurs with dragons."

The obvious conclusion is that except for their devotion to evolutionary theory, identification of dinosaurs with dragons would be the logical interpretation of the evidence.

Only two years after the publication of Greatest Monsters, however, Carl Sagan, a renowned astronomer and popularizer of the atheistic evolutionary interpretation of science, published The Dragons of Eden, which in spite of the time and evolutionary development problems asks, "Could there have been man-like creatures who actually encountered Tyrannosaurus Rex?" Sagan asserts, "One way or another, there were dragons in Eden." Outspokenly an evolutionist, Sagan's book is subtitled, "Speculations on the Evolution of Human Intelligence." He does not, of course, view Eden in the classical Christian or Biblical sense of the word. By "Eden," he means an emerging humanity's dawning awareness of their existence. And he doesn't say human beings encountered Rex, but "man-like creatures." But this is still quite a step in the thinking of those tied to their evolutionary time scale.

Dragons in the Bible

For the Bible-believing creationist, of course, no time or evolutionary problems exist, and the facts of ancient literature and prehistoric art square very nicely with the Scriptural account. According to Genesis 1:21-23, water animals were created on the fifth day; according to Genesis 1:24-25, land animals, as well as man and woman, were created on the sixth day. Thus, according to the Bible all animals were created at approximately the same time. There were no long ages when man was not present and when dinosaurs ruled the earth. The Authorized Version utilizes the word "dragon" sixteen times, all in the Old Testament, rendering two Hebrew words which mean "sea or land monster."

But perhaps even more graphic are some Biblical references which use other names for the creatures but which clearly describe dinosaurs. In Job 40:15ff, for example, Behemoth is described: "Is strength is in his loins, and his force is in the navel of his belly" (40:'16). Behemoth was a huge creature, and reading of it, one schooled in early literature can scarcely help but think of Fafnir, the dragon of early Danish fame. Behemoth, we read, moved his tail like a cedar. A tail as huge and powerful as a cedar tree? What animal can that possibly describe but a dinosaur? "His bones are as strong pieces of brass; his bones are like bars of iron" we read (40:18), perhaps recalling Sigurd, trembling because of the strength of the dragon Fafnir. When the author of Job writes "he that made him can make his sword to approach unto him," can the writer mean that only God is normally able to bring about the death of such a powerful creature? Again, I mentally envision Sigurd hiding in the pit, waiting for just the right moment to strike at one of the few places the dragon was vulnerable. Behemoth is a water creature, for "he lieth under the shady trees, in the covert of the reed, and fens...the willows of the brook compass him about" (40:22). This creature has a huge thirst, for "he drinketh up a river" (40:23). What animal other than a dinosaur can be described like this?

In the next chapter of Job, we read of another great creature, Leviathan. As with Behemoth, the record tells of God describing these creatures, and implies that Job was familiar with them. God is reminding Job of the great difficulty in catching a creature like Leviathan. God had created Leviathan, for He declares, "whatsoever is under the whole heaven is mine" (41:11). Leviathan has terrible teeth and scales or a strong, protective covering, typical of many dinosaurs. Do you see Sigurd trembling before Fafnir when you read, "When he (Leviathan) raiseth himself up, the mighty are afraid" (41:25)? Job is usually considered to be one of the oldest of the Bible books, possibly written when ice covered large parts of Europe and North Anerica shortly after the Great Flood. Many Bible scholars feel that some dinosaurs may have survived the Flood, being water creatures, but that due to severe climactic changes, they died out within a few generations after the Flood. If these small-brained creatures were experiencing hardships to which they were unaccustomed and ill-adapted, one can easily understand why a tradition of monstrous, fearsome dragons is recorded in virtually all early western cultures, which would have developed during or shortly following the time of Job.

The Bible presents this time in history as a time of dispersion (Gen 10,11). People groups were moving out away from Ararat, where their fathers had landed after the Flood, out away from Babel, where they had congregated. They were venturing into the new lands that were to become their homes. The whole earth was unknown to them. At the same time, great climatic changes may have caused the dinosaurs to have been uncharacteristically hostile.

It is true that eastern traditions have not viewed the dragon as fearsom and evil, as have western cultures. We can only speculate as to the reason, but it is possible that the eastward migrating people groups simply did not have the gruesome encounters that their western contemporaries must have experienced. If so, these eastern peoples may have told their children stories of dinosaurs as they were handed down from before the Flood, when life was ideally adapted to their existence, food was plentiful, and perhaps animals and humans did not kill one another for food (Gen. 9:3).

CONCLUSION

I propose that early humanity did encounter dragons, or dinosaurs. This means that humanity did not evolve millions of years after the dinosaures became extinct, but that the two co-existed. Each piece of evidence by itself may perhaps be explained away, as those who accept evolutionary concepts are prone to do. But the evolutionary model of history which separates humanity and dinosaurs by millions of years leaves too many unanswered questions. How could a people draw pictures of dinosaurs on ancient cave walls, if none were around to serve as models? How is it that so many ancient cultures wrote about dinosaurs (dragons), if they were unknown to early humanity? How do the early literary accounts of dragons end up being so realistic, down to the smallest details?

The evidence for the co-existence of humanity with dinosaurs is overwhelming. I have often heard it said that if evidence can be adduced from a number of different disciplines, it is strong indication to the veracity of a hypothesis. I have shown evidence from archaeology, prehistoric art, ancient literature, legend and mythology, and the Bible. This evidence leads me to the conclusion that human beings shortly after the dispersal from Babel did indeed encounter dinosaurs in the early earth, and that they drew them, wrote of them and passed on tales of them to their children. The dragons of ancient art and literature, I conclude, were in fact dinosaurs.

Hope I didn't bore ya to death

EDIT: Please Don't Quote Me On This

Oo_TEL_oO

Queen: Spread Your Wings


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Celfious
Celfious


Responsible
Legendary Hero
NPC
posted February 12, 2003 02:15 PM

I looked at birds today. Seagulls actually.
They were flying, and chilling in the water. It's like 30, or 20 degrees where I am.
I said, "****, those birds must be feezin' their nuts off!"

Well, I do actually feel bad for those birds, and I wish I could've helped them to a warm meal, and blankets.But this is a different story. It made me wonder however.
Do birds have *ehem* testicles?
Seems in relation to this thread barely enough to bump it and say keep more info comming please =)

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Illidan
Illidan


Hired Hero
posted February 13, 2003 11:04 AM

lol..

Gryphons/Griffons/Griffins were choosen to be guardians of the gold river that contained many gold, they loved to eat horses and hated cyclopses who tried to steal the gold from the river.

Naga's looked more like giant serpents with the faces of females, the naga homm uses are more like the demon/tanar'ri queens marilith from D&D, in the legends naga's can be male and female.

Satyr's were rough humanoids with goatparts that loved to get drunk and run after nymph females all day, the most famous satyr was Pan.

Efreeti were the evil versions of genies, instead of forfilling beautifull and good wishes the efreeti's could only forfill evil wishes, they were created by the evil fire god in some legends)

Unicorns were cursed princes that were vain and evil in their human life, then they got cursed and turned into horses with golden hoves and horns, they got the favorite hunting subject from their own king fathers that didn't know it was about their own child, so they got hunted by their own unknowing father.

Nightmare is a doomed horse cursed and changed by the devil to be his mount, whenever you see this horse your nightmares about the beast will never end and your sleep will forever be ruined(That's why they called it nightmare)

Trolls are norse giants with the sizes of mountains, in other legends it were stories to frighten the children.(Bedtime stories)

Imps are mana eating childs of the devil, they are often used as familiars for evil wizards and often betray their own master when they have absorbed enough knowledge from them.

Gargoyles are statues filled with an evil spirit from a demon, they are used by warlocks and other evil humanoids for guarding treasures or places, other stories tell about gargoyles being friendly and guarding for good only.

THunderbirds are giant eagles that said to be seen around america, they are said to kidnap bad children and original americans say they are the bringers of storm and badluck, they carry thunder and lightning on their wings.

Ogres are green giants that often guarded bridges and asked for gold to pass a particular spot. When not paid they should eat the traveler, other stories tell about ogres being lake giants that kidnap bathing females for an unown evil lake god.

Harpies are evil hag creatures, in mythology they kidnapped good souls and brought them to the underworld, they had the lower bodies of ugly vultures and the upper bodies of beautifull females or ugly old womans, they attacked the argonauts in one story.

Centaurs: They are pretty much like the satyr's only they have horse features instead of goat.






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