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Heroes Community > Heroes 5 - Temple of Ashan > Thread: Similatrities in Between Heroes V and The Ancient World/Middle Ages and Mythology
Thread: Similatrities in Between Heroes V and The Ancient World/Middle Ages and Mythology This thread is 2 pages long: 1 2 · NEXT»
VokialBG
VokialBG


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posted January 22, 2007 07:03 PM bonus applied.
Edited by alcibiades at 22:36, 25 Mar 2007.

Similatrities in Between Heroes V and The Ancient World/Middle Ages and Mythology

Many of the creatures in Heroes 5 are mythical creatures, the hero classes like Knight and Necromancer are real "classes" in the Ancient World, the architecture in H5 towns is based on real architecture...

This is Thread for "Similatrities in Between Heroes V and The Ancient World/Middle Ages and Mythology"


Part 1 -- Creatures --

1.1 Academy

Gremlin



The gremlins are not real a mythical creatures like the Golems or the Djinns:

"A gremlin is a mythological mischievous creature. Gremlins are depicted as mechanically oriented and extremely devious.

The concept of the Gremlins as responsible for sabotaging aircraft is first recorded among airmen of Britain's Royal Air Force during World War II, in particular the men of the high altitude Photographic Reconnaissance Units (PRU) of RAF Benson, RAF Wick and RAF St Eval. The story attempted to explain the accidents which often occurred during their flights.

The lore of the gremlin sometimes known as gremal was first published in issue 13 of the servicemen's fortnightly Royal Air Force Journal dated April 18, 1942 although that article states the stories had been in existence for several years, and there are later recollections of it having been told by Battle of Britain Spitfire pilots as early as 1940. The author of the first article was Hubert Griffith. Later sources have sometimes claimed that the concept goes back to World War I, but there is no print evidence of this."


You can read the "ROYAL AIR FORCE JOURNAL - The Gremlin Question " (April 18, 1942) here.


Gargoyle


The Gargoyles are statues, the first Gargoyle are used in Egypt.

A local legend that sprang up around the name of St. Romanus (631 – 641 A.D.), the former chancellor of the Merovingian king Clotaire II who was made bishop of Rouen, relates how he delivered the country around Rouen from a monster called Gargouille, having had the creature captured by a liberated prisoner. The gargoyle's grotesque form was said to scare off evil spirits so they were used for protection. In commemoration of St. Romain the Archbishops of Rouen were granted the right to set a prisoner free on the day that the reliquary of the saint was carried in procession.
View of Paris from the Galerie des Chimères on Notre Dame de Paris. 13th century.

Although most have grotesque features, the term gargoyle has come to include all types of images. Some gargoyles were depicted as monks, combinations of real animals and people, many of which were humorous. Unusual animal mixtures, or chimeras, did not act as rainspouts and are more properly called grotesques. They serve more as ornamentation, but are now synonymous with gargoyles.






Golem



The earliest stories of golems date to early Judaism. Adam is described in the Talmud (Tractate Sanhedrin 38b) as initially created as a golem when his dust was "kneaded into a shapeless hunk". Like Adam (whose name literally means "earth,") all golems are created from mud. They were a creation of those who were very holy and close to God. A very holy person was one who strove to approach God, and in that pursuit would gain some of God's wisdom and power. One of these powers was the creation of life. No matter how holy a person became, however, a being created by that person would be but a shadow of one created by God.

Early on, the notion developed that the main disability of the golem was its inability to speak. In Sanhedrin 65b, is the description of Raba creating a golem using the Sefer Yetzirah. He sent the golem to Rav Zeira; Rav Zeira spoke to the golem, but he did not answer. Said Rav Zeira, "I see that you were created by one of our colleagues; return to your dust." It is said that if a golem were made able to speak, that would give it a soul, and—because a golem cannot be made perfectly—that ability could make it very dangerous.


Djinn



For the ancient Semites, jinn were spirits of vanished ancient peoples who acted during the night and disappeared with the first light of dawn; they could make themselves invisible or change shape into animals at will; these spirits were commonly believed to be responsible for diseases and for the manias of some lunatics. Types of jinn include the ghul ("night shade", which can change shape), the sila (which cannot change shape), the afrit, and "marid". From information in The Arabian Nights, marid seem to be the strongest form of jinn, followed by afrit, and then the rest of the jinn.

Arabs believed that the jinn were spirits of fire, although sometimes they associated them with succubi . The feminine form of jinn is jinniyah or jinneyeh.


Titan



The Titans are kind of gods in the Greek mythology, they are twelve, six Titans and six Titanides (females).

They were the elder Gods long before the Olympian Gods came to be. Kronus was their father but later in a titanic clash the twelve Gods defeated and imprisoned them to Tartarus. Most of them anyway.

The Titans were associated with various primal concepts, some of which are simply extrapolated from their names: ocean and fruitful earth, sun and moon, memory and natural law.


1.2 -- Dungeon --

Minotaur



In Greek mythology, the Minotaur was a creature that was part man and part bull. It dwelt in the Labyrinth, which was an elaborate maze-like construction built for King Minos of Crete and designed by the architect Daedalus to hold the Minotaur. The Minotaur was eventually killed by Theseus-the hero.


He was the unfortunate offspring of Pasiphae, Minos's wife and Poseidon's sacred bull! It was meant as a sacrifice but Minos refused and the God made his wife love the bull...The minotaur was placed in the labyrinth as a way to kill the 7 unlucky Athenians that would be sent there every year. Kinda a tribute of blood for Athens, 7 people were chosen to enter the labyrinth. Defeating the monster was not easy but finding your way out was impossible. Good thinking on Ariadne's part!


Hydra



In Greek mythology, the Lernaean Hydra was an ancient nameless serpent-like chthonic water beast that possessed numerous heads— the poets mention more heads than the vase-painters could paint— and poisonous breath. The Hydra of Lerna was killed by Heracles as one of his Twelve Labours.

The Lernaian hydra had nine heads one of which was immortal. They had an interesting property, when one chopped off two would come out in its place. Hercules with Iolaus's help cauterized the wound after a head was removed so that none would grow back until the last and immortal head went down. They had to bury it as separation from the body did not harm it.


1.3 -- Haven ---

Conscript



The Conscripts are typical for all countries in the middle ages, when the country is in war and need more troops the ordinary man are trained for Conscripts and they go to war.

Griffin



The Griffin is a legendary creature with the body of a lion and the head, with upstanding ear-tufts, and wings of an eagle: as the lion was considered the "King of the Beasts" and the eagle the "King of the Air", the griffin was thought to be an especially powerful and majestic creature. The griffin is generally represented with four legs, wings and a beak, with eagle-like talons in place of a lion's forelegs and feathered, equine-like ears jutting from its skull. Some writers describe the tail as a serpent, in the manner of a chimera.

Classical and heraldic griffins are male and female. Some medieval heraldic traditions say that only female griffins have wings. A "male" griffin, called a keythong in a single fifteenth-century English heraldic manuscript, is an anomaly that belongs strictly to a late phase of English heraldry


Inquisitor



"An inquisitor was an official in an inquisition, an organisation or program intended to eliminate heresy and other things frowned on by the Roman Catholic Church. Literally, an inquisitor is one who "searches out" or "inquires".

The chief inquisitor of an inquisition was often called the Grand Inquisitor."


Paladin



"A paladin or is a certain high-level official found in numerous countries of medieval and early modern Europe.

Originally, the paladine was created first in Ancient Rome as a chamberlain of the Emperor and the imperial palace guard called praetorian guard by Diocletian. In the early Middle Ages, the meaning changed into the official of the Catholic Church in the pope's service and one of the major nobleman of the Holy Roman Empire, named count palatine. Similar titles were also used in 19th century Hungary and in the German Empire and United Kingdom during the early 20th century."


The Paladin need to be skilled in:

Art
Medicine
Literature


Archangel



An Archangel is a superior or higher-ranking angel. Archangels are found in a number of religious traditions, including Christianity, Islam and Judaism.

The New Testament rarely speaks of angels, and makes only two references to archangels: Michael in Jude 1.9 and I Thessalonians 4:16, where the "voice of an archangel" will be heard at the return of Christ. Contrary to popular belief, Gabriel is never called 'archangel' in the Gospels.

In later Christian tradition, however, there are three Archangels: Michael, Gabriel, usually Raphael, and sometimes Uriel is given as a fourth. Eastern Orthodox tradition mentions Seven Archangels.Uriel is included, and the other three are most often cited as Selaphiel, Jegudiel, and Barachiel.

Sometimes Satan is considered a fallen Archangel whose original name was Lucifer Morningstar instead of the common name of just Lucifer.

Some Protestants view Michael as the sole Archangel, as the only one explicitly described as such in the Protestant canon of the Bible. (Jude 1:9)

The edition of the Bible used by Protestants, which excludes the Apocrypha, never mentions a "Raphael" and he is therefore not recognized by many of them. Raphael, however, is mentioned in the Book of Tobit, one of the deuterocanonical books. In the story, Raphael comes to the aid of Tobit, healing him of blindness, and his son Tobias, driving away a demon that would have killed him. Raphael also plays an important role in the Book of Enoch.

Orthodox icon of the seven archangels. From left to right: Jegudiel, Gabriel, Selaphiel, Michael, Uriel, Raphiel, Barachiel


1.4 -- Inferno ---

Imp



An imp is a mythological being similar to a fairy, frequently described in folklore and superstition.

Imps are usually described as mischievous more than seriously threatening, and as lesser beings rather than more important supernatural beings. The attendants of the devil are sometimes described as imps. They are usually described as lively and having small stature.

Imps are the least evil of all demons, described as dark, shadowy creatures — while mischievous and somewhat destructive; they do not go to the extremes of, for example, gremlins or poltergeists. Imps are shape-shifters — preferring a shadow-form similar to either a weasel or a spider; they slink or skitter about, running from one pool of shadow to another. The trickery ascribed to them is, generally, confined to missing, misplaced, or moved articles (socks, keys, etc.) and stubbed toes. Some accounts of imps claim that they are desperately lonely, and always travel in pairs or in mobs.

Some accounts of imps treat them as capable of being turned to good, because they are so desperately lonely they would do almost anything — even commit good deeds — to have a committed friend; however, it is regarded as almost impossible for any imp to fully forsake its "impish" ways.


Demon



In religion, folklore, and mythology a demon is a supernatural being that has generally been described as a malevolent spirit, and in Christian terms is the opposite of an Angel.

As the Iranian Avestan and Vedic traditions as well as other branches of Indo-European mythologies show, the notion of 'demons' has existed for many millennia.

Ancient Egyptians also believed in demonic monsters that might devour living souls while they traveled towards the afterlife, although demons per se did not exist in Ancient Egyptian belief.


Cerberus



In Greek mythology, Cerberus is the hound of Hades, a monstrous three-headed dog (sometimes said to have 50 or 100 heads) with a snake for a tail and serpentine mane.

He guarded the gate to Hades (the Greek underworld) and ensured that the dead could not leave and the living could not enter. His sister was the Chimera.


Succubus



In Western medieval legend, a succubus is a demon who takes the form of a beautiful human female to seduce men (especially monks) in dreams to have sexual intercourse. They draw energy from the men to sustain themselves, often until the point of exhaustion or death of the victim.

Devil



The spirit or power of evil. Though sometimes used for minor demonic spirits, the word devil generally refers to the prince of evil spirits and as such takes various forms in the religions of the world. In the monotheistic Western religions, the devil is viewed as a fallen angel who in pride has tried to usurp the position of the one and only God. In Judaism, and later Christianity, the devil was know as Satan. In the Old Testament, Satan is viewed as the prosecutor of Yahweh's court, as in Job, chapters 1 and 2, but he is not regarded as adversary of God. In post biblical Judaism and Christianity, however, Satan became known as the prince of devils, and assumed various names: Beelzebub (the Lord of Flies) in Matt. 12:24-27, often cited as Beelzebul (Lord of Dung), and Lucifer (the fallen angel of Light). In Christian theology the devil's main task is that of tempting man to reject the way of life and redemption and to accept the way of death and destruction. The leader of the angels who have fallen from heaven because of pride, Satan has as his main adversary in Christian thought, legend, and iconography the archangel Michael, leader of God's heavenly hosts. Islamic theology is rich in references to Iblis, the personal name of the devil, who is also known as ash-Shaytan (The Demon) and 'aduw Allah (Enemy of God). In the Qur'an, Iblis first appears in the story of the creation of the world. He alone of the angels refuses God's order to bow before Adam, the first man. He is then cursed by God; his punishment is to come on the Day of Judgement, but until then he is empowered to tempt the unfaithful (but not true believers). Iblis next appears as the tempter of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. In Islamic theology Iblis is described as an angel, a jinn (spiritual creature capable of good or ! evil), or an angel who was the leader of the jinni. The question of his sins of pride disobedience are especially important in the Sufi traditions, in which he is sometimes presented as a true monotheist who would bow only to God. The devil was also an important figure in the syncretic religions. In Gnosticism the devil was often called the Demiurge (the Creator) and in Manichaeism the Prince of Darkness, as well as other names. The devil, as the great power of evil, has been much depicted in religious and secular literature and art. At various intervals in history, devil worship becomes significant for certain individuals dissatisfied with existing religious institutions, and exorcism (the casting out of demons) is often consequently reinstated by these institutions.

1.5 -- Sylvan ---

Pixie



Pixies are mythical creatures of English folklore, considered to be particularly concentrated in the areas around Devon and Cornwall, suggesting some Celtic origin for the belief and name. In regional dialect, these mischievous little folk are sometimes referred to as piskies/piskeys or the little people. They are usually depicted as wingless, with pointed ears, and often wearing a green outfit and pointed hat. Sometimes their eyes are described as being pointed upwards at the temple ends.

Druid



The Druids were polytheists, but also deified elements of nature, such as the sun, the moon, and the stars, looking to them for "signs and seasons". They also venerated other natural elements, such as the oak, certain groves, tops of hills, streams, lakes and even plants, especially mistletoe and holly. Fire was regarded as a symbol of several divinities and was associated with the sun and cleansing.

Unicorn



The unicorn is a mythical beast usually depicted with the body of a horse and one usually spiral horn on its forehead. The unicorn's blood and horn are said to have mystical healing properties and can neutralize poisons. Many horned animals such as rhinoceri were hunted during the Middle Ages. Their horns were sold as unicorn horns. This virtue is derived from Ctesias's reports on the unicorn in India:

   "Those who drink out of cups made from [the horn] are proof against convulsions, epilepsy, and even poison, provided that before or after having taken it they drink some wine or water or other liquid out of these cups."

The ability of unicorn horns to neutralize poison has been touted since the time of Aristotle. The English ambassador to the French court was treated in 1596 with medicine containing "musk, amber, gold, pearl and unicorn’s horn", the efficacy of the ingredients being directly related to their rarity and expense.

Though the qilin, a creature in Chinese mythology, is sometimes called "the Chinese unicorn", it is a hybrid animal that looks less unicorn than chimera, with the body of a deer, the head of a lion, green scales and a long forwardly-curved horn. The Japanese version more closely resembles the Western unicorn, even though it is based on the Chinese qilin.


1.6 -- Fotress ---

Dwarves

Dwarves are small, stubborn humanoids with long beards. They live in caves, holes and hollow trees. Dwarves work in mines where they delve minerals and metals.

Dwarves are talented with hammers and axes. Tough they are often drunk and are warriors of nature, they are also intelligent, wise and very skillfull with their hands and make the most beautiful, and sometimes magical, objects and structures. In Norse mythology, the dwarves Brok and Sindri made many magical artifacts for the gods, like Thor's hammer Mjollnir and Odin's ring Draupnir. Dwarves themselves are resistant to magic. But some dwarves dislike magic and use technology instead.

Dwarves have long-lives (400 years).


1.7 -- Necropolis ---

Skeleton



Animated human skeletons are known to have personified death in Western culture since the Middle Ages. The Grim Reaper is often depicted as a hooded skeleton holding a scythe (and occasionally an hourglass), which has been attributed to Hans Holbein the Younger (1538). Death as one of the biblical horsemen of the Apocalypse has been depicted as a skeleton riding a horse.



Zombie



In the Middle Ages, it was commonly believed that the souls of the dead could return to earth and haunt the living. The belief in revenants (someone who has returned from the dead) are well documented by contemporary European writers of the time. According to the Encyclopedia of Things that Never Were, particularly in France during the Middle Ages, the revenant rises from the dead usually to avenge some crime committed against the entity, most likely a murder. The revenant usually took on the form of an emaciated corpse or skeletal human figure, and wandered around graveyards at night. The "draugr" of medieval Norse mythology were also believed to be the corpses of warriors returned from the dead to attack the living. The zombie appears in several other cultures worldwide, including China, Japan, the Pacific, India, and the Native Americans.

The Epic of Gilgamesh of ancient Sumer includes a mention of zombies. Ishtar, in the fury of vengeance says:

   "Father give me the Bull of Heaven,
   So he can kill Gilgamesh in his dwelling.
   If you do not give me the Bull of Heaven,
   I will knock down the Gates of the Netherworld,
   I will smash the doorposts, and leave the doors flat down,
   and will let the dead go up to eat the living!
   And the dead will outnumber the living!
   It will be awful!"


Vampire



Vampires are mythological or folkloric creatures believed to be the re-animated corpses of human beings who subsist on human or animal blood.

The word Vampire come from Upire - evil demon from the Slavic mythology.

In folklore, the term usually refers to the blood-drinking humans of Eastern European legends, but it is often extended to cover similar legendary creatures from other regions and cultures. The characteristics of vampires vary widely between these different traditions. Some cultures also have stories of non-human vampires, including real animals as bats, dogs, spiders, and mythical creatures such as the chupacabra.


1.8 --- Common creatures:

Dragons

A dragon is a serpentine legendary creature. Dragons are commonly portrayed as serpentine or reptilian, hatching from eggs and possessing extremely large, typically scaly, bodies; they are sometimes portrayed as having large eyes, a feature that is the origin for the word for dragon in many cultures, and are often (but not always) portrayed with wings and a fiery breath. Some dragons do not have wings at all, but look more like long snakes. Dragons can have a variable number of legs: none, two, four, or more. Modern depictions of dragons are very large in size, but some early European depictions of dragons were only the size of bears, or, in some cases, even smaller, around the size of a butterfly.

Sources:

Wikipedia En
Wikipedia BG
Wikipedia DE
Encyclopedia Britannica
Some cool books
Heroes 5 Images - AOH

Anything missing?


Moderators comment: QP applied for a thorough and indepth investigation that gives us an entertaining and enlightening insight in the creatures that inhabit the world of Ashan. Keep up the good work.
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GenieLord
GenieLord


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posted January 22, 2007 08:27 PM

Very nice work you did here.

It's this part (about the Golems):
Quote:
The earliest stories of golems date to early Judaism. Adam is described in the Talmud (Tractate Sanhedrin 38b) as initially created as a golem when his dust was "kneaded into a shapeless hunk". Like Adam (whose name literally means "earth,") all golems are created from mud. They were a creation of those who were very holy and close to God. A very holy person was one who strove to approach God, and in that pursuit would gain some of God's wisdom and power. One of these powers was the creation of life. No matter how holy a person became, however, a being created by that person would be but a shadow of one created by God.


According to the Juadism, the men's creation was like that:
The god picked up some ash, and put in it the spirit of life. he called what he created Adam (comes from the word Adama, means earth or ash). What he created is exactly the same men we have today.
There are three things that the god has and he didn't give the man: the knowledge what's right and what's wrong, the power to create things and life that never ends.
The lord put Adam is the paradise (here, paradise means huge natural garden) and warn him not to eat the fruits of the knowledge tree (a tree that make who eats of it's fruit to know what's right and what's wrong) or the life tree (a tree that eating of it's fruits will make the eater to live for ever) because if he will, he will get closer to god, and he shouldn't. After it, he created the woman, Hava.
The man and the woman are the only creatures in the paradise except of the snake, that are naked (naked means without any fur or cover).
The snake tempted Hava to eat from the knowledge tree's fruits. Adam was convinced to eat from the the knowledge tree's fruits, too. God punished them by: taking the snake's legs, making the woman suffer when she gives birth and I don't remeber how he punished Adam (I learned it in the 1st grade!).
Adam and Hava were explelled from the paradise.

So the man has one thing that close to god, the knowledge of what's right and what's wrong, that's it.
And there are no Golems in the Juadism, that's sure.
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VokialBG
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posted January 22, 2007 08:39 PM

I know the story, I'm christian. It is in our Old Testament.
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GenieLord
GenieLord


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posted January 22, 2007 08:48 PM
Edited by GenieLord at 20:49, 22 Jan 2007.

Quote:
I know the story, I'm christian. It is in our Old Testament.


Great.
And I know the Talmud. I can promise you, there's nothing there about the Golems.

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VokialBG
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posted January 22, 2007 08:55 PM
Edited by VokialBG at 20:58, 22 Jan 2007.

Well, not the golem from H5, the golem info is from a book (not the bible) i mean just the golems are some king of man, made of dirt, rocks and water, but has a soul. In H5 the golem is mechanical, steel and without soul...

I can find info for the mechanical golem...

And actually, the word "Golem" mean "stupid" nope this is not a joke.
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theluCas
theluCas


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thiNk
posted January 22, 2007 08:57 PM

To write this forum has to be very time consuming .
When i will have time, i want to start with strategic forums.
I will play toh and describe my strategy.

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GenieLord
GenieLord


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posted January 22, 2007 09:02 PM

Quote:
Well, not the golem from H5, the golem info is from a book (not the bible) i mean just the golems are some king of man, made of dirt, rocks and water, but has a soul. In H5 the golem is mechanical, steel and without soul...

I can find info for the mechanical golem...

And actually, the word "Golem" mean "stupid" nope this is not a joke.


In this case, you are still wrong.
In the Talmud, there's the man as it is, not from earth or rocks, that just how he was created.
There's no different kind of man that is made of earth and rocks...
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VokialBG
VokialBG


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posted January 22, 2007 09:05 PM

Quote:

In this case, you are still wrong.
In the Talmud, there's the man as it is, not from earth or rocks, that just how he was created.
There's no different kind of man that is made of earth and rocks...


The golems are made by alchemists in the myths...not by...God
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Ted
Ted


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Supreme Hero
Peanut Exterminator
posted January 22, 2007 09:17 PM

you guys read the Bible to much (for GL Talmod, correct me if wrong), i am English and i've never read a page of the Bible

i prefere to think that the Big Bang created the universe, when i die i get reincarrnated, and in luck
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theluCas
theluCas


Adventuring Hero
thiNk
posted January 22, 2007 09:45 PM

Quote:
you guys read the Bible to much (for GL Talmod, correct me if wrong), i am English and i've never read a page of the Bible

i prefere to think that the Big Bang created the universe, when i die i get reincarrnated, and in luck


haha, and if u read something about darwin theory or bible, many scientist say, that bible is better in describing genesis of word.

Our culture is very stupid, it starts to be material oriented, many of our power are unused, unknown. In my town is bible considered for myth and darwin theory as true, not theory, but TRUE.

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Ted
Ted


Promising
Supreme Hero
Peanut Exterminator
posted January 22, 2007 09:50 PM

that may be true, but in my school, a teacher, said that ....

fist there was nothing (before big bang)

then, suddenly, boom, everything (after big bang)

so how can nothing make something? and what caused the big bang?
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Elvin
Elvin


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What if Elvin was female?
posted January 22, 2007 09:52 PM
Edited by Elvin at 01:13, 23 Jan 2007.

Nice one! I'll take a look just in case I can add a few things.

Titans:
They were the elder Gods long before the Olympian Gods came to be. Kronus was their father but later in a titanic clash the twelve Gods defeated and imprisoned them to Tartarus. Most of them anyway.

Minotaur:
He was the unfortunate offspring of Pasiphae, Minos's wife and Poseidon's sacred bull! It was meant as a sacrifice but Minos refused and the God made his wife love the bull...The minotaur was placed in the labyrinth as a way to kill the 7 unlucky Athenians that would be sent there every year. Kinda a tribute of blood for Athens, 7 people were chosen to enter the labyrinth. Defeating the monster was not easy but finding your way out was impossible. Good thinking on Ariadne's part!

Hydra:
The Lernaian hydra had nine heads one of which was immortal. They had an interesting property, when one chopped off two would come out in its place. Hercules with Iolaus's help cauterized the wound after a head was removed so that none would grow back until the last and immortal head went down. They had to bury it as separation from the body did not harm it.

Djinn:
I've read the original story of Aladdin and Afrit, Marid were the names of the genie of the lamp and the ring. Probably they called them by their division? They were supposed to be large and terrifying in sight.
In Islam they have communities much like human societies: they eat, marry, die, etc. They are invisible to humans, but they can see humans. Sometimes they accidentally or deliberately come into view or into contact with humans. Jinn are believed to live much longer than humans. An "Ifrit" is a type of strong and powerful jinn. Evil or malicious jinn are called "Marid" usually they're malicious due to their feeling they have been usurped by humans. Jinn have the power to transform into other animals and humans, and they are known to prefer the form of a snake. Djinns also have the power to possess humans, have much greater strength than them, and live much longer lives. They  were said to be controllable by magically binding them to objects, remember the lamp?

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VokialBG
VokialBG


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posted January 25, 2007 06:05 PM

Updated with "Haven - Creatures"

@Elvin can I write your textes in the "master post".
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Elvin
Elvin


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What if Elvin was female?
posted January 25, 2007 06:25 PM

Sure go ahead!
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VokialBG
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posted February 22, 2007 10:15 AM
Edited by VokialBG at 11:30, 22 Feb 2007.

Updated with:

1.4 - Inferno

EDIT:

And 1.5 - Sylvan + 1.6 - Fotress + 1.7 Necropolis
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emilsn
emilsn


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posted February 22, 2007 12:30 PM
Edited by emilsn at 12:30, 22 Feb 2007.

What can you say. The king of vampires, can dokument a lot of the things... Great work VokialBG... You should be some kind of history kind ... (if you not already are?) ... Great, nice info...¨

When i read about the griffin, I saw for the first time that Nival have not made a regular griffin, The lion legs are in rear end and there is actully not much lion about it...

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Elvin
Elvin


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What if Elvin was female?
posted February 22, 2007 01:17 PM

An interesting part about the griffin and its association with the religious haven: 'Being in part both a flying and a land-bound animal, it was seen in Christianity to be a symbol of Jesus Christ (who was both human and divine' Also I read somewhere it was also because of the combination of might and ability to ascend the skies(heaven).

According to christianity the archangels are incorporeal entities whose presence can be felt when the appear and are messengers of God. A higher class among the angels. I think that there are six or so classes of angels but I don't know their names in English.

Imps are usually described as mischievous more than seriously threatening, and as lesser beings rather than more important supernatural beings. The attendants of the devil are sometimes described as imps. They are usually described as lively and having small stature.

Since the imps are mentioned we should not leave the familiars out of this! Familiars are usually mischievous creatures that serve as apprentices to powerful mages. Not always loyal

The funny part about the demons is that in christian belief they are spirits who deserted God and followed satan. Yes, they are fallen angels! In almost any rpg they are corporeal(usually) ranging from weak to extremely powerful so it may come as a surprise. They can possess living creatures but will leave them if a ritual of exorcism is completed.

I have heard of this version of cerberus but he is better known with 3 heads. The snake tail part is usually not mentioned either.

The male counterpart of the succubus is an incubus and more or less did the same work It is speculated that his creation was to justify unexpected births hehe

The best source we have learnt about them comes from a book by Julious Caesar. Just as in Asterix they had herbalism knowledge and carried with them a sickle to cut mistletoe. What is not mentioned is the belief that they made human sacrifices to gain strength and obtain power. It's possible that they did but it was never confirmed. A part of them moved to England where they would gather in Stonehenge and they possibly still exist.

European vampires before the book of Bram Stoker was released. They were thought to rise from the graves of people that had been murderers and had committed evil deeds. They are nocturnal, the sun is but a liability to them-not lethal and very hard to kill. The most accepted way to do that was to decapitate them, impale them on a stick and put a garlic in their mouth.(I'm gonna puke...) The stakes became popular due to dracula's end in the movie though in the book he was pierced by Morris's dagger. Another trait they seemed to have is shapeshifting to animal forms. Again the popular version is Dracula who could turn into mist, wolf and bat. He could not use them under the sun but wasn't too weakened otherwise.

As for sources wikipedia has been one and other sites I have come across randomly. Been some time since I read these but I remembered most things.
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VokialBG
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posted February 23, 2007 04:07 PM

Thanks for the supplements Elvin
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Elvin
Elvin


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What if Elvin was female?
posted February 23, 2007 05:19 PM

Reading about myths and fantasy lore is something of a hobby of mine so why not? It's not like I have to search for it on demand!
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Daystar
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posted February 28, 2007 02:41 AM

Why was there no QP awarded? Good reaserch, and a nice guide.

But why was there nothing on dragons?
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